• Kent Brandenburg

The Judgment of People By People

From what I’ve read, what office workers hate the most about their job is inner office gossip. They don’t like being talked about by their co-workers, become fodder of office conversation. This also relates to judgment. Office workers think they’re being assessed, being judged. People judge each other and they make conclusions. Sometimes they talk about their judgments for whatever reason they think it to be necessary. All of this is why people don’t like or want to be judged. Scripture talks about judgment. It’s actually necessary. Everyone judges and everyone needs to judge. We all make choices and we’ve got to judge in order to make good choices. We judge between one thing and another. It’s how you take the correct or best paths in life, to judge between those paths and take the right or best one. How do you judge paths and people and make the right assessments or judgments? You use scripture. You judge according to God’s Word. That is to “judge righteous judgment,” as Jesus said in John 7:24. On the other hand, in 1 Corinthians 4:6, the Apostle Paul says concerning judgment of people, “that ye might learn in us not to think of men above that which is written.” This means only use scripture in your judgment of men. Men have liberty in non-scriptural areas. When scripture doesn’t apply, you allow liberty or not “think of men above that which is written.” The Bible does often apply, but it isn’t righteous to require someone to submit, acquiesce, or align where scripture is silent.

14 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

Mother’s Day is a time in which we can reflect on the influence and sacrifice of our mothers. Mothers have a tremendous privilege and a great responsibility to nurture children. Nurturing speaks of g

The Apostle Paul commended the church at Philippi for the support they gave him on his missionary journeys. Paul went to Philippi on his second missionary journey. Lydia and her household became mem

Psalm 104 was the theological backdrop for the hymn Sir Robert Grant (1779-1838) wrote: “O Worship the King.” Grant, a lawyer by training, a member of the British Parliament, and ultimately the Gover