• Kent Brandenburg

Purpose of Government and Voting

Voting for a Christian in the United States relates to the biblical purpose of government. God instituted government early on the Bible when Noah and his family got off the ark. Some call this the beginning of the dispensation of human government. Genesis 9:6 reads: “Whoso sheddeth man's blood, by man shall his blood be shed: for in the image of God made he man.” The first and most important purpose of government is to protect life. The founders of the American government declared in the Declaration of Independence, expressing this very belief and commitment: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. — That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed.” Governments are instituted among men to secure the right to life. Yes, you read that correctly. “We the people” in the preamble to the United States Constitution, said that we instituted that document to “establish justice.” Justice in its most fundamental way is, life for a life. Only one political party is committed to the protection of life. Romans 13 talks about government rewarding the good, but also bearing the sword to punish the evil doer. If someone takes a life, the punishment is a life. Protecting the unborn child and punishing the one taking the life is how someone understands in the most fundamental sense God’s purpose.

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