• Kent Brandenburg

First What or How, not Why

How do things go wrong? People very often like to emphasize the “why” they go wrong. I asked, How? Maybe people have a reason why it’s gone wrong for them. Maybe people are just blaming other people for why they’re doing the wrong thing. When Adam and Even sinned in the garden, instead of thinking, how and what, they asked, “Why?” Eve blamed the serpent and Adam blamed Eve. In the end, they blamed God. Adam said, “The woman thou gavest me.” What is right is what is right. What is the truth is what is the truth. Someone might say, “It wasn’t my fault I didn’t do right or I didn’t believe or obey the truth.” It’s what’s right. It’s what’s the truth. Just do it. Stop blaming it on someone else. As well, others should stop looking for excuses. Stop asking, why? Someone could cause someone to stumble, but when someone stands before God, he will have no excuse. He shouldn’t be given an excuse, because he’s not going to have one in the end. Everyone is still responsible for doing what’s right. How do things go wrong? They go wrong when someone disobeys God in word, attitude, or deed. He or she did this to me. He or she did this. That doesn’t change the truth of God’s Word. God’s Word is still true. A person needs to hear the truth, not an excuse. He doesn’t need to hear another reason not to do what he’s supposed to do. Someone will not be better off or do better by disobeying scripture in any way. It’s not going to help to do that, no matter what the reason.

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