• Kent Brandenburg

Apocalyptic

A pandemic such as the one we and the rest of the world are experiencing brings allusions to end times, and usually the word is apocalyptic or even dystopian. Sometimes reality becomes very close to fiction. People associate apocalypse with plagues, like seen in the last book of the Bible, Revelation, in chapter six and following. Men die in massive numbers. News of death tolls hearken to plagues and apocalypse. Except. Apocalypse doesn't mean plagues and death tolls. The name of "Revelation" translates the Greek word of which the transliteration is "apocalypse." "Apo" means "from." and "calypse" means "cover." Together the word means "cover from," or better, "uncover" or "unveil." The book of Revelation unveils something. The time in which we live unveils a lot about mankind right now, his hopelessness and in most instances meaninglessness. The Apocalypse that is Revelation unveils Jesus Christ, because He is the answer to hopelessness and meaninglessness. When Jesus returns, He will come unveiled from human flesh in the heavenly glory to which He is due. He can help take you through difficult times or any times when you know Him. You need Him. I hope you come and join us and learn more about Jesus Christ as we see and hear the Word of God unveiled, apocalypse, at Jackson County Baptist Church.

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