• Kent Brandenburg

Self-Evident Truths

The second paragraph of the Declaration of Independence, written by Thomas Jefferson, starts with these well-known words: “We hold these truths to be self-evident.” Then he lists those self-evident truths upon which the declaration of independence from England is based. What is a self-evident truth? Thomas Jefferson and those in his day believed there were those. The dictionary says that a self-evident truth is “an assumption that is basic to an argument, a hypothesis that is taken for granted.” Scripture supports the idea of self-evident truth. Romans 1 says that men already know God. The existence of God is self-evident. Many traits about God are also self-evident, so that men are without excuse as to the wrath of God on them. Many in the world call reliance on the Bible, circular reasoning. Since the Bible says that it is the Word of God, then we can depend on what it says. The inspiration and authority of the Word of God is self-evident. It’s like saying that a ruler is straight. You just know it to be true. You don’t need another ruler to test to see if it is straight. Self-evident truths are a necessity in a world of sin. Sin affects men’s ability to know what they should know, to do what they should do. God has made truth to be self-evident so that someone can know the truth despite the inability to know it. It isn’t dependent on men. God has made it self-evident. Many assumptions are necessary to apply the Word of God. God assumes that men will know those truths when they see them because they are self-evident.

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