• Kent Brandenburg

Psalm 110 and the Church

Psalm 110 is the most quoted passage in the New Testament. The Apostles obviously thought highly of it. Hebrews may be an exposition of Psalm 110, because it’s in there again and again. What is Psalm 110 about? I reference it in various sermons at different times. Peter used it in his sermon in Acts 2 as a major part of his message that important day. Psalm 110 is a Messianic prophecy of Jesus just after His ascension. After He disappears through the clouds, He would enter the throne room of God, what I call the control center of the universe, and God the Father says to Him to sit down at His right hand. This enthronement of Jesus next to the Father is the position that Jesus takes until the second coming, where the Father says that He will make His enemies His footstool. All of that is future to this seating at the right hand of God the Father. The right hand is a position of authority. Then in the present tense Jesus says to rule in the midst of His enemies, so Jesus in the present after His ascension rules from heaven at the right hand of God. How is Jesus ruling today? He rules through the church. He is the Head of the church. What people don’t like about the church, I’ve found, or even the Bible and God, is the authority? They don’t want to be told what to do. They want to operate outside of church authority. They think they are the pillar and ground of the truth. As a result they don’t submit to church authority and they operate outside of the headship of Jesus Christ. He rules through the church.

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